Course Information

 

for General Studies Department


Speech Fundamentals (CC 110)

Credits:3

3 Hours An introductory course in the delivery of speeches through participation, using both extemporaneous and outline forms.

Speech Fundamentals Lab (CC 110 Lab)

Credits:0

Introduction to Computing (CS 150)

Credits:2

2 Hours This is an introductory course in computers and communication systems. The course surveys the major types of computer hardware and software. It includes discussion of computer selection and implications of computer use. Students use a microcomputer to apply common applications to their major.

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECN 201)

Credits:3

3 Hours Emphasis upon macroeconomic theories of international and national income determination, consumption,investment,savings, business cycles, prices and money, the banking system, monetary and fiscal policy. Includes historical review of development and economic doctrines.

Personal Finance (ECN 250)

Credits:3

3 Hours A study of the aspects of personal finances, including budgeting, buying on credit, borrowing, saving, investment, insurance, home ownership, and estate planning.

Principles of Microeconomics (ECN 301)

Credits:3

3 Hours Emphasis upon general microeconomic policies, an introduction to theories of consumer behavior, product demand, cost and supply, production,the organization and its markets, capital and pricing factors. Includes application of to personal finance

Basic Writing (EN 120)

Credits:3

3 Hours Study of basic skills in writing with an emphasis on writing clear sentences, paragraphs, and short essays; designed to help students gain control over thinking and writing skills.

Composition and Grammar (EN 130)

Credits:3

3 Hours Study of basic sentence structure, conventional usage, and construction of logical thought units, including practice in writing larger units.

Critical Research (EN 131)

Credits:3

3 Hours Prerequisite: EN 130. An introduction to information literacy and research methods which will guide the student to become an information-literate student and professional and guide the student through the complexities of organizing and drafting a research paper.

Creative Writing (EN 240)

Credits:3

3 Hours Instruction in serious expression through experimentation with various writing genre.

Introduction to Geography (GEO 210)

Credits:3

3 Hours A survey of the physical and cultural elements of the Earth's landscape, the importance of maps and their uses, and the relationship of people to the elements of the Earth.

Geography of North America (GEO 220)

Credits:3

3 Hours A study of the North American continent with a focus on its physical, cultural, and historical geography.

Chapel/Small Groups (GS 101)

Credits:0.5

.5 Hours Chapel sessions are held twice weekly for corporate worship and spiritual enrichment. Additional sessions include mission emphasis in the Fall Semester and lectureships in the Spring Semester.

Outreach Ministries (GS 102)

Credits:0

Guided service opportunities available and required of all GLCC students.

Academic Success (GS 109)

Credits:1

3 Hours Academic success is designed to help students in the transition to college, focusing on what students need to know to be successful at the collegiate level. Students will learn how to properly cite, how to organize, plan financially, how to research and take notes, critical thinking and communication skills. Students will also get to know the area and learn a out mental health, character building and team unity.

Physical Education - College Athletics (GS 111)

Credits:1

1 Hour Participation in a college athletics program.

Physical Education - College Athletics (GS 112)

Credits:1

Physical Education - College Athletics (GS 113)

Credits:1

Physical Education - College Athletics (GS 114)

Credits:1

Student Leadership Development (GS 200)

Credits:1

Ancient Western Civilization (HI 140)

Credits:3

3 Hours A historical survey and cultural examination of the early civilizations that once flourished in ancient Mesopotamia, Palestine, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, terminating with the traditional date for the "fall" of the Roman (i.e., A.D. 476).

Medieval Western Civilization (HI 141)

Credits:3

Must be taken concurrenty with LI 141. A historical survey and cultural examination of the Western world (mostly Europe and Britain) from the fall of the Roman Empire (A. D.476) through the Reformation era of the 16th century.

Modern World Civilization (HI 242)

Credits:3

3 Hours Must be taken concurrently with LI 242. A historical survey and cultural examination of the major events, people, and problems of the world since the onset of the 17th century.

United States History 2 (HI 251)

Credits:3

3 Hours A study of the historical and cultural development of the United States of America commencing with the Reconstruction Period after the Civil War and concluding with today's U.S. involvement in World situations.

Restoration History (HI 310)

Credits:2

2 Hours A study of the development and doctrines of that movement given initial impetus by Alexander Campbel (et al.) at the inception of the 19th century, and today identified with the body known as the Church of Christ or Christian Church.

Ancient Rome (HI 340)

Credits:3

3 Hours A primary and secondary source examination of the history and culture of Ancient Rome from its mythological foundations around 1150 and 753 B.C. to its fall in 476 A.D., with special emphasis upon the first century A.D.

Black American History (HI 350)

Credits:4

4 Hours An advanced study of the hardships and achievements of black Americans from their abduction from Africa through the experiences of legalized slavery, Civil War, sudden emancipation, the economic slavery of sharecropping, racial prejudice and persecution, the civil rights movement, and continuing economic and social frustration today.

Russian History (HI 360)

Credits:3

3 Hours An advanced study of Russia from the times of the earliest barbarian groups and the Varangian traders through the periods of Kievan domination, Muscovite ascendance, Romanov czarism, the "Time of Troubles," Peter the Great's "Westernization," World War I and the revolutions, the period of the USSR, and today's subsequent move toward democratization.

Seminar on the Civil War (HI 470)

Credits:1

1 Hour An in-depth study and analysis of the American Civil War beginning with its background causes and ending shortly after Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Seminar on World War 2 (HI 475)

Credits:1

1 Hour An in-depth study and analysis of World War II beginning with its roots in the Treaty of Versailles and ending shortly after V.J. Day.

American Historiography (HI 480)

Credits:3

3 Hours A seminar on the writings of American history with an emphasis upon the interpretational framwork and perspectives of each era and author. A selection of prize-winning histories will be read to augment the course.

Research Methods in History (HI 490)

Credits:3

3 Hours An independent study with close teacher supervision designed to teach the student how to research and write high-quality historical works. The final grde will represent an evaluation of the finished product.

Theater Skills (HU 160)

Credits:2

2 Hours The course aims to develop acting techniques with a concentration in improvisation, ensemble building, theater games, and character and scene development. Skills will be incorporated into scripted works later in the semester. The course will culminate with a workshop performance.

Ancient Western Literature (LI 140)

Credits:2

2 Hours Must be taken concurrently with HI 140. A survey of the literature of the Western world from its Mesopotamian beginnings through Egyptian, Greek and Roman writings to the fall of the Roman Empire.

Medieval Western Literature (LI 141)

Credits:2

2 Hours Continuing survey of the literature of the Western world (mostly Europe and Britain) from the fall of the Roman Empire to the through the Reformation era of the 16th century.

Modern Western Literature (LI 242)

Credits:2

2 Hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 Must be taken concurrently with HI 242. An examination of world literatures and cultures, identifying philosophical and ideological expressions since the onset of the 17th century.

English Literature 1 (LI 250)

Credits:3

3 Hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 A study of selected English literature from the Middle Ages through the 18th Century.

English Literature 2 (LI 251)

Credits:3

3 Hours A study of selected English literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

American Literature 1 (LI 260)

Credits:3

3 Hours A survey course of American literture from early PUritan writings through the Civil War.

American Literature 2 (LI 261)

Credits:3

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 A Survey of major American literature from post-Civil War to the present.

Children's Literature (LI 320)

Credits:3

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 A study of the literature designed for ages infant through adolescent with strategies for instruction of elementary ages

Theological Themes in Contemporary Literature & Cin (LI 340)

Credits:3

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 A study of dominant theological themes in modern literature - humanity's view of self, others, God, reality with readings from Sartre, Camus, Hemingway, Lewis, Kersey, Adams, Golding, Coupland, Irving, and others. Films which present the dilemma of modern people in search of meaning are also included.

Seminar in Christian Authors (LI 460)

Credits:3

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 A study of the primary works of a selected author with some ancillary readings about the author.

Shakespeare (LI 470)

Credits:3

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 Selected Shakespearean histories, comedies, and tragedies with special emphasis upon Shakespeare's themes, dramatic interpretations, and Elizabethan worldview.

Special Studies in Literature (LI 490)

Credits:1

3 hours Prerequisites: LI 140, LI 141 Guided research and examination of one or more literary figures, a particular period in literature, or a specific genre.

Quantitative Literacy (MA 200)

Credits:3

3 Hours This course develops the student's ability to apply mathematical reasoning in the everyday world. It emphasizes the practical use of numbers in real-world contexts such as business, consumer finances, politics, history, and social sciences.

Introduction to Statistics (MA 250)

Credits:3

3 Hours This is a survey course whose topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random variable, normal distribution, t distribution, chi-square distribution, F distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression.

Cultural Diversity (oCCM 233)

Credits:3

World Civilizations (oHI 231)

Credits:3

Exploring God's World (oSC 140)

Credits:3

Worldviews and Ethics (PH 280)

Credits:3

3 hours A study of various worldviews that underlie Western and Eastern thought regarding humanity, the natural world, and ultimate reality and their resultant ethical frames of reference and implications.

Developmental Psychology (PY 220)

Credits:3

3 hours An investigation of human growth from birth through adulthood emphasizing psychological factors involved in physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development.

Physical Science and Lab (SC 120)

Credits:4

General Biology (SC 130)

Credits:3

4 Hours A survey of cellular theory and biological processes found in living organisms along with a study of the general human body and field identification of flora and fauna. Ecological topics will also be explored.

Biological Foundations of Nutrition (SC 200)

Credits:2

2 hours The biological basis of health, human nutrition, and body fitness. This course is designed to blend the science of nutrition, health, and body fitness with the science of human biology. As such, it is a very practical class that describes how diet, exercise, and environmental factors impact the human body. Class topics include lifespan nutrition, roles of major nutrias and their function, diet composition, nutritional recommendations and clinical use, micro-nutrients and metabolic processes, biochemistry individuality in nutrition, impact of food on body and mind (including its relatioship to stress reduction, cardiovascular health, and weight reduction), conventional and alternative medicine practices, a fitness/physiology requirement, and other biological/health topics.

Science by Inquiry (SC 210)

Credits:4

4 Hours This course will survey life science, physical science, and earth/space science. Students will learn science concepts through inquiry-based activities as well as traditional methods. Students will become familiar with the use of the metric system and common scientific instruments and technology.

Sociology (SO 270)

Credits:3

3 Hours a study of structures and functions of society, with special attention paid to the impacts of social agencies, education, and the family on individuals and cultures. This course emphasizes the skills of ethnographic research and participant observation.